The impact of age stereotypes on source monitoring in younger and older adults


Kuhlmann, Beatrice G. ; Bayen, Ute J. ; Meuser, Katharina ; Kornadt, Anna E.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037/pag0000140
URL: http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBu...
Additional URL: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/pag/31/8/875/
Document Type: Article
Year of publication: 2016
The title of a journal, publication series: Psychology and Aging
Volume: 31
Issue number: 8
Page range: 875-889
Place of publication: Washington, DC
Publishing house: American Psychological Assoc.
ISSN: 0882-7974 , 1939-1498
Publication language: English
Institution: School of Social Sciences > Kognitive Psychologie mit Schwerp. Kognitives Altern (Juniorprofessur) (Kuhlmann 2015-)
Subject: 150 Psychology
Keywords (English): age stereotypes , source monitoring , cognitive aging , multinomial modeling
Abstract: Anna E. Kornadt Bielefeld University In 2 experiments, we examined reliance on age stereotypes when reconstructing the sources of state- ments. Two sources presented statements (half typical for a young adult, half for an old adult). Afterward, the sources’ ages—23 and 70 years—were revealed and participants completed a source-monitoring task requiring attribution of statements to the sources. Multinomial model-based analyses revealed no age-typicality effect on source memory; however, age-typicality biased source-guessing: When not remembering the source, participants predominantly guessed the source for whose age the statement was typical. Thereby, people retrospectively described the sources as having made more statements that fit with stereotypes about their age group than they had truly made. In Experiment 1, older (60–84 years) participants’ guessing bias was stronger than younger (17–26 years) participants’, but they also had poorer source memory. Furthermore, older adults with better source memory were less biased than those with poorer source memory. Similarly, younger adults’ age-stereotype reliance was larger when source memory was impaired in Experiment 2. Thus, age stereotypes bias source attributions, and individuals with poor source memory are particularly prone to this bias, which may contribute to the maintenance of age stereotypes over time.

Dieser Eintrag ist Teil der Universitätsbibliographie.




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